Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘history’

It’s been an ideal time of year to see historic houses, and we stumbled on this one just as we were driving to one of Ezra’s band gigs.  Who knew this little historic gem would be nestled amidst the factories of an industrial neighborhood between Queens and Brooklyn (Ridgewood) ?

Vander Ende–Onderdonk House is a historic house at 1820 Flushing Avenue in Ridgewood, Queens It is the oldest Dutch Colonial stone house in New York City.  The original house on the site was built in 1661 by Hendrick Barents Smidt, from land that was granted to him by Peter Stuyvesant.  Another part of the structure, expanding from the original house, was built in 1709 by Paulus Vander Ende.

Clearly it’s got us thinking about adding a ‘dutch door’ to our house!

IMG_2303IMG_2304IMG_2305IMG_2306IMG_2307IMG_2308IMG_2309IMG_2311IMG_2312IMG_2313IMG_2314IMG_2316IMG_2317

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Last weekend our synagogue took part in a ‘place of worship crawl’ of sorts… where we walked around the neighborhood and explored a number of different churches and temples all in a 10 block radius.  Rumor has it that Flushing Queens boasts up to 200 different places of worship – synagogues, Catholic and Methodist churches and Buddhist temples, Shinto temples.  At the end of our trip we got to go to the Flushing Quaker Meeting House – built in 1694!  Of course it’s chalk full of ghost stories and best of all, it seems to be the first site of religious freedom in America.  Its first members created a remonstrance to be accepted in Peter Stuyvesant‘s rigid idea of what New York/America should worship.  See the actual remonstrance here!

(to add: this is called the ‘Interfaith Unity Walk‘ and it happens twice a year in Queens.  I should also add that I did something like this with my mom when I was about 11 years old and it was really moving then, as it is now – how much we all have in common despite differing religions)

 

IMG_9936IMG_9941IMG_9944IMG_9946IMG_9947IMG_9948IMG_9949

Read Full Post »

It was maybe exactly 10 years ago that me and my husband first went to this amazing place, with my belly full of Ezra and the summer stretched ahead of us.  We finally got to return – and this time with a grown Ezra and little Zoe. My kids love flowers and gardens and wide open spaces so this weekend romp was a hit.   Zoe loves the little pink playhouse with its own lavender gardens. By the time we made it to the Coe Hall Historic House I felt as if I were roaming around some place in Europe and it’s no wonder.. it was totally created to look like an English Castle by its first owners.

IMG_3118IMG_3129IMG_3146IMG_3148IMG_3180

IMG_3240IMG_3239IMG_3244IMG_3186IMG_3191IMG_3192IMG_3197IMG_3204IMG_3206IMG_3214IMG_3221IMG_3225

Read Full Post »

Well I haven’t been here for many years, but I’ve always loved the mansions on the bluff at Newport RI.  We walked the ‘cliff walk’ with the kids just a couple weekends ago .. and took in the stellar ocean view and fresh sea air.  More mansions will be opening up again with the warmer season coming.  I can’t wait to some day tour and share my knowledge of the Rosecliff with the kids (where the first Gatsby movie with Mia Farrow was filmed) – my favorite mansion tour!

Zoe does some cartwheels –
IMG_6475

IMG_2681IMG_2687IMG_2690IMG_2706IMG_2711IMG_2718

IMG_2719

strange yellow moss on rocks along the cliff walk

IMG_2730IMG_2738

Read Full Post »

Ok a graveyard doesn’t necessarily sound like a gorgeous spring-time outing, but this cemetery was amazing!  Not only are the grounds bursting with new growth and flowers, but there are famous characters buried here such as Leonard Bernstein, Boss Tweed, Charles Ebbets, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Louis Comfort Tiffany, and Horace Greeley.  We had to bring Zoe’s friend Hazel along who – at the tender age of 5 – is already VERY ‘into’ scary movies and cemeteries.  I hope to return here for a proper tour on a day that the green trolley buses are moving around giving tours.

 

photo 1photo 3photo 4Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 1.08.23 PMScreen Shot 2016-04-20 at 1.09.45 PMphoto 2photo 3photo 4photo 5

Read Full Post »

During the last 2 days of Hanukkah we visited family in the Boston area – and after another session of gift-opening we got outside to do what Bostonians do: bump into history everywhere! We went to see the Wayside Inn while the weather was temperate and we could do a short hike around outdoors. Ezra loved seeing a musket loaded by a minuteman. And we visited a small schoolhouse where the poem ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb’ was written!

IMG_0610

IMG_0565

IMG_0575

IMG_0586

IMG_0587

IMG_0594

IMG_0602

IMG_0605

Read Full Post »

Ah finally we got to go to a place that I remember so fondly as the ‘school field trip’ location of my youth! When I was young we regularly went here (and to Sturbridge Village) – so often that I felt as if I had both memorized. But a lot has changed since then. It was a hot day, and I’m happy my kids made it through without too much complaint.

We arrived on a day when they had a demonstration of cooking/baking in the 1680s – and they pointed out that since wheat and sugar were rarely plentiful, a cake or ‘butter pie’ like the one seen below was an extra special treat. I was fascinated to learn that part of the reason why people back in England kept rumoring Plimoth as a ‘paradise’ was largely due to the fact that the pilgrims could eat whatever they caught. According to the actors at the site – swan, deer, pheasants etc were game that – when captured back in England – was considered the King’s property and only he could eat it. Who knew? The thought that our country may’ve been started largely based on the culinary boredom of English eaters kind of makes me giggle…

dlAttach.php

dlAttach-2.php

dlAttach-5.php

dlAttach-6.php

dlAttach-8.php

dlAttach-10.php

dlAttach-11.php

dlAttach-14.php

dlAttach-15.php

dlAttach-16.php

dlAttach-17.php

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »